Farmers in Kenya willing, able to ramp up croton nut output for biofuel

Small-holder farmers in Kenya have the capacity and desire to play a major role in the scale-up of biofuel production from agroforestry, according to a Penn State forest economist, who led a study in the East African country.

Croton trees—which seem to grow everywhere in Kenya—and the oilseeds they produce have the potential to improve rural livelihoods, said Michael Jacobson, professor of forest resources, College of Agricultural Sciences. Through the production of oil for energy and co-products, such as animal feed and organic fertilizer, croton represents an opportunity many poor farmers are eager to take.

That is the conclusion Jacobson reached after surveying hundreds of Kenyan farmers and meeting with them in villages across four counties in the central region of the country. The objective was to assess household preferences for planting and cultivating croton trees for collection and selling of nuts to a growing market. Researchers gathered and analyzed demographic data on income, household size, age, other occupations and village from farmers to determine if those factors influence their preferences.

Farmers were presented with production scenarios and asked to make choices depending on seedling cost, oilseed yield, tree-maturation period, labor needed for seed collection and seed selling price. Results show that almost all households have croton trees on their land and are willing to produce croton nuts. More importantly, Jacobson noted, most would be willing to plant more croton trees.

✅Reference

Farmers in Kenya willing, able to ramp up croton nut output for biofuel

Rate this post
برچسب‌ها
نمایش بیشتر

نوشته‌های مشابه

دیدگاهتان را بنویسید

نشانی ایمیل شما منتشر نخواهد شد. بخش‌های موردنیاز علامت‌گذاری شده‌اند *

همچنین ببینید

بستن
دکمه بازگشت به بالا
EnglishIran
بستن
بستن